GM Makes Transmission Control Module Repair Easier With Release of Programming Tools – UnderhoodService

GM Makes Transmission Control Module Repair Easier With Release of Programming Tools

The programming setup is easily accessible via a download that can be secured through a TIS2Web Service Programming subscription, GM's next-generation Technical Information System. Seven subscription packages are offered, varying by price, expiration date and support level. With a subscription in hand, all that's required for a tech to flash the TEHCM is a J2534 device or scan tool.

GM Transmission Electro-Hydraulic Control Module (TEHCM), front view.GM Customer Care & Aftersales (GM CCA) is releasing the diagnostic and programming keys essential to repairing and replacing GM 6-speed automatic transmissions. As a result, Independent Service Centers (ISCs) will be able to access the digital tools needed to "flash" the component that gives the GM 6-speed its unique performance capabilities — the Transmission Electro-Hydraulic Control Module (TEHCM). The module, housed within the transmission while bathed in transmission fluid, contributes to the transmission’s adaptability, efficiency and overall performance.

"There’s never been a better time for ISCs to get into the GM 6-speed transmission servicing business," says Jessica Earl, product specialist, Transmissions and Transfer Cases, GM CCA. "With expanded availability of the TEHCM and ready access to essential diagnostics and programming tools, ISCs won’t be forced to leave money on the table with transmission work."

The programming setup is easily accessible via a download that can be secured through a TIS2Web Service Programming subscription, GM’s next-generation Technical Information System. Seven different subscription packages are offered, varying by price, expiration date and support level. With a subscription in hand, all that’s required for a technician to "flash" the TEHCM is a J2534 device or scan tool.

No-Charge Trial Subscription Available
For a limited time, GM CCA is offering a two-day TIS2Web trial subscription to ISCs at no charge (this promotion is not available to subscribers in Massachusetts). When they purchase a GM 6-speed replacement automatic transmission assembly between Oct. 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014, ISCs can access the TEHCM programming with the no-charge subscription. ISCs obtain a promotional code for the no-charge subscription by calling GM toll-free at 866-453 4123 and providing their business name, contact information, transmission assembly part number, serial number and the VIN. The code is then used when accessing the subscription via www.acdelcotechconnect.com.

With access to the TEHCM programming tools required to perform virtually any work on a GM 6-speed, ISCs will be able to venture into a business area that has largely been reserved for transmission specialists or GM dealer service departments. Some 6.8 million GM 6-speed vehicles dating to the 2007 model year are on the road today. Between now and 2017 another 6.4 million are projected to be built. That translates to a potentially big opportunity for ISCs to handle repair and replacement work as those vehicles’ warranties expire and transmissions require servicing.

Meanwhile, GM is expanding availability of its OE TEHCMs, which are the preferred replacement option. They are now sold under the ACDelco brand, as well as the Genuine GM Parts name. Unlike non-OE modules, they’re built to exacting GM specifications and deliver consistently smooth shifts, superior fuel economy and extended operating life.

New and remanufactured GM engines, transmissions and transfer cases are covered by a 36 months or 100,000 miles limited warranty. GM powertrain assemblies are tested by GM under stringent and demanding conditions to ensure the highest reliability and quality. For additional information, contact your GM dealer or go to www.genuinegmparts.com.

 

 

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