AfterMarketNews Auto Care Pro AutoProJobs Auto-Video.com Brake&Frontend BodyShopBusiness Counterman EngineBuilder Fleet Equipment ImportCar Motorcycle & Powersports News Servicio Automotriz Shop Owner Tire Review Tech Shop Tomorrow's Tech Underhood Service

Do Training, Technology And Parts Sourcing Issues Keep You Up At Night?

We often hear that the things that keep shop owners awake at night pertain to profitability, productivity, training, keeping up with technology, shop operations/expenses and parts quality/availability. This month, we hear directly from one of your...

Read more...

Top 10 Automotive Repair Shop Pet Peeves

No two days are the same for the owner of a repair shop. Every day brings its unique set of challenges to overcome, but, for the most part, the day progresses along and one day passes to the next. But, there are those occasions when certain daily activities...

Read more...

Keeping Counterfeit Parts Off The Road

One constant refrain in the technical features on AutoCarePro and all of our sister sites, is the need to use quality parts — and trust where that part is coming from. Failing to do so puts your customer and your shop’s reputation at risk. But...

Read more...

Engine Coolant Temperature Diagnostics

While old-school cooling system service often ­focused on coolant leaks and overheating engines, let’s begin thinking “new-school” by looking at modern cooling systems through the eyes of the engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor. Coolant temperature...

Read more...

Volkswagen: Parking Indicator Sounds Off with No Obstacle

Customer complains that the parking assistance issues warning sounds for both the front and/or rear of vehicle with no obstacle in range. Water intrusion into sensor holders is causing corroded plug contacts and sensor electrical pins, which results in...

Read more...

Volkswagen: Unnecessary Electric Coolant Fan Replacements

Model: 2006 Volkswagen Jetta Sedan Customer concerns of “electric coolant fans continue to run after the ignition is switched off” are resulting in unnecessary coolant fan replacements. It is considered normal operation for the electric coolant...

Read more...

Weak Air Ride Compressor Diagnostics

Air ride systems always used to have two diagnostic paths: either the vehicle was riding low or the compressor blew a fuse. Today’s modern vehicles have computer-controlled air ride units at all four corners that can pose a unique diagnostic challenge...

Read more...

Ford Fusion Alignment Spec (2005-‘13)

Millions of Ford ­Fusions were sold in the U.S. between 2005 and 2013. When it comes to alignments, it is critical to diagnose the customer first, to find out if their Fusion drifts or pulls, and then to check all of the possibilities for the complaint...

Read more...

Nissan Titan Brake Job

The Titan is Nissan’s full-size pickup. The Titan has had no major brake problems or recalls, and the brakes are fairly easy to service. Nissan had a few teething problems with brake judder on 2004-‘06 models, but this was corrected with better...

Read more...

Educating Drivers, Technicians and Service Advisers with Dill’s New TPMS Videos

Dill Air Controls has launched its new TPMS training and educational videos, supporting three audiences — consumers, technicians and service advisers. The consumer videos are available in shortened versions, and are positioned for the customer waiting...

Read more...

Top 5 Tools: Kenny Younkins, Ken’s Auto Service Center

Kenny Younkins, owner Ken’s Auto Service Center Akron, OH While Ken first said his favorite tool is his fishing rod, he said in the shop he prefers these five:   Snap-on 3/8” Drive Impact Wrench Mastercool Brake Flaring Kit Mitchell...

Read more...

Mitchell 1 Enhances Quick Links and Printing Functions in Latest Release of ProDemand

Mitchell 1 announces it has made several important enhancements in the latest release of its ProDemand repair, diagnostic and maintenance information program as a direct response to customer feedback. The implemented changes include an expanded Quick...

Read more...

Home Emissions Tech Tip: Multiple Cylinder Misfire or Rough Idle on Chrysler Models

Print Print Email Email

This bulletin involves rotating all ­engine exhaust valves, replacing the valve spring retainer locks with a new design to increase valve rotation at lower rpm, inspecting/replacing the MAP sensor (as necessary), and decarbonizing the combustion chamber.

Models: 2004-’06 Pacifica (CS) and 2005-’06 Chrysler 300/ Magnum/Charger (LX)

Note: This bulletin applies to CS models built after Feb. 1, 2004 (MDH 0201XX) equipped with a 3.5L engine (Sales Code EGN).

Symptom/Condition
The customer may experience occasional engine misfire (rough-running engine) during certain
vehicle operating conditions.

In addition, MIL illumination may also have occurred due to DTC P0300 – Multiple Cylinder Misfire. Various single cylinder misfire DTCs may also be present. If the frequency of misfire is high, the powertrain control module (PCM) may place the engine in “limp-in” mode.

The misfire condition may be caused by one or more engine exhaust valves that are slow to close due to a buildup of carbon on the valve stem.

Diagnosis
1. This condition may occur when the engine is not allowed to run at engine rpms that are greater than 3,500. At 5,000 rpm or higher, the engine exhaust valves will rotate if not impeded by high carbon deposits. Low engine rpms and high carbon deposits are associated with short-trip driving where the engine is not allowed to fully warm to normal engine operating temperatures.

Cold ambient temperatures will increase engine warm-up time and increase the likelihood of carbon deposit buildup on the stem of the engine exhaust valve. Fuel detergent quality may also contribute to the condition; the customer may want to try a different brand of fuel.

2. Verify that the engine misfire condition is not caused by faulty engine mechanical or electrical components.

3. If the engine mechanical and electrical systems are operating properly, perform the Repair Procedure.

Repair Procedure
Valve Rotation:

1. Relieve the fuel pressure.

2. Remove the upper intake manifold.

3. Remove the cylinder head cover(s).

4. Remove the rocker arm and shaft assembly.

5. Clean and mark the tip of each exhaust valve stem at the 12 o’clock position with a paint marker. The paint mark will be used later to assist with determining the amount of valve rotation.

6. Remove the spark plugs.

7. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise, until the number 1 piston is at Top Dead Center (TDC) on the compression stroke.

8. Install the compression tester spark plug adapter in cylinder #1 spark plug hole. With the air hose attached to the spark plug adapter, apply 620.5 to 689 kPa (90 to 100 psi) air pressure. This is to hold the valves into place while servicing the components.figure 1

9. Using a valve spring compressor tool (MD 998772A) with the valve spring adapter (6527 or equivalent), slightly compress the exhaust valve spring to release tension against the valve and valve spring retainer (see Figure 1).

10. Remove the valve spring retainer locks and discard the locks.

Note: It is important that the valve rotation section of this repair procedure be performed.

Caution: Only grab the valve stem tip, being careful not to cause damage.

11. Using needle-nose pliers, grab the tip of the valve stem and rotate the exhaust valve 90° (move the mark to the 3 o’clock position).

12. Install two new valve spring retainer locks (P/N 53022277AA).

13. After installing the locks, release the tension on the valve spring and verify proper installation.

14. Remove Special Tool MD 998772A (1) and the spark plug adapter tool.

15. Repeat steps 7-14 on the remaining five cylinders using the firing sequence 1-2-3-4-5-6. Make sure the piston is at TDC in each cylinder of the exhaust valve spring retainer lock that is being removed. When all the exhaust valves have been rotated 90° and all the exhaust valve spring retainer locks have been replaced, proceed to the next step.

16. Install the rocker arm and shaft assembly.

17. Install the cylinder head cover(s).

18. Install the upper intake manifold figure 2

MAP Sensor Inspection:
1. Inspect the MAP sensor — Figure 6 for LX models or Figure 3 for CS models.

a. If the MAP sensor is the new style, no further action is necessary for the MAP sensor. Proceed to Decarboning Combustion Chamber and Valves.

b. If the MAP sensor is the old style, proceed to the next step.

2. Replace the MAP sensor with P/N 05033310AC for LX models or P/N 04896003AB for CS models. If the vehicle is a CS model, be sure the new sensor opening is facing a downward direction when installed and only use one fastener.

When complete, proceed to Decarboning Combustion Chamber and Valves.

Decarboning Combustion Chamber and Valves:
Caution: Do not use the Premium Air Intake Cleaner provided with kit 05174566AA for this service action.

Note: Use both fuel tank additives.

1. Pour the Premium Fuel System Cleaner from kit P/N 05174566AA and Combustion Clean P/N 05183546AA, into a full fuel tank.

2. Start the vehicle’s engine and allow it to reach normal operating temperature.

3. Disable the fuel pump by removing the fuel pump relay.

4. Disconnect the fuel supply line quick disconnect fitting from the fuel rail.

5. Install the appropriate adapter, either #31814 or #31815. Be sure to engage the adapter completely (push until a “click” is noticed).Figure 3

6. Pour the Premium Combustion Chamber Cleaner from kit P/N 05174566AA, into the cleaning
canister.

7. Suspend the fuel injector cleaning apparatus under the hood. The regulator knob must be fully counterclockwise to the off position. Connect the cleaning apparatus service hose to the supply adapter.

8. Turn the regulator knob clockwise to the recommended cleaning pressure (58 psi). Be sure there are no leaks before starting the engine.

9. Start the engine and run at normal idle (or fast idle, 1,200-1,500 rpm, to shorten service time) until the product has been used up and the engine stalls.

10. When the engine stalls, turn the ignition off.

11. Disconnect the cleaning apparatus and adapter.

12. Reconnect fuel line and the fuel pump relay.

13. Turn the ignition key to the on position to energize the fuel pump. Check for leaks. Start the engine and run for at least 2 minutes to clear the fuel system of any residual product.

14. Using the DRBIII or the Star-SCAN, erase any engine DTCs.

Road Test:
1. In a safe vehicle operating location that will allow the vehicle to be driven safely and at the posted speed limit, accelerate the vehicle until the engine reaches 4,500 rpm.

2. Hold the engine speed at this rpm for 15 seconds.

3. Slow down and, in a safe location, pull to the side of the road. Allow the engine to idle for five ­seconds.

4. Repeat steps 1 through 3 five more times.

Courtesy of ALLDATA.

The following two tabs change content below.
Underhood Service Staff Writers

Underhood Service Staff Writers

Underhood Service Staff Writers

Latest posts by Underhood Service Staff Writers (see all)

Latest articles from our other sites:

Clore Offers Redesigned Digital Battery & System Tester with Integrated Printer

Newly redesigned, the SOLAR BA327 from Clore Automotive offers a complete testing solution for 6- and 12-volt batteries and 12- and 24-volt charging systems. The tester’s integrated printer provides...More

PaceSetter Performance Products Offers Direct-Fit Manifold Catalytic Converter For 2002-'08 Mini Cooper S, 1.6L Engine

PaceSetter Performance Products, designers and manufacturers of quality-made, affordably-priced exhaust systems and components, now offers a direct-fit manifold catalytic converters for the 2002-'08 Mini...More

Engine Coolant Temperature Diagnostics

While old-school cooling system service often ­focused on coolant leaks and overheating engines, let’s begin thinking “new-school” by looking at modern cooling systems through the eyes of the engine...More

Volkswagen: Parking Indicator Sounds Off with No Obstacle

Customer complains that the parking assistance issues warning sounds for both the front and/or rear of vehicle with no obstacle in range. Water intrusion into sensor holders is causing corroded plug contacts...More

Weak Air Ride Compressor Diagnostics

Air ride systems always used to have two diagnostic paths: either the vehicle was riding low or the compressor blew a fuse. Today’s modern vehicles have computer-controlled air ride units at all four...More

Diagnostic Strategies For Solving TPMS Errors

The first step in any diagnostic strategy is to figure out whether or not your customer's vehicle actually has a TPMS problem. Any number of things can cause the TPMS warning light to come on or flash....More

Coats’ Double-Sided Collets Capable of Fitting Most Car and Light Truck Wheels

As opposed to standard cones, the design provides technicians with a durable and precise mounting method, replicating the mounting of the wheel on the vehicle. When back coning, the shallow depth and...More

Clore Offers Redesigned Digital Battery & System Tester with Integrated Printer

Newly redesigned, the SOLAR BA327 from Clore Automotive offers a complete testing solution for 6- and 12-volt batteries and 12- and 24-volt charging systems. The tester’s integrated printer provides...More