Tech Tip: The Durango Won’t Go – UnderhoodService

Tech Tip: The Durango Won’t Go

Recently, we serviced Paul's 2002 Dodge Durango. The next day he parked his truck at the airport and flew to Philadelphia for a sales convention. When Paul returned, he called me with a problem. While leaving the airport he put the truck in reverse, but it didn't move for a few seconds. I asked him to bring the Durango in so we could determine the problem, since the truck hadn't had any issues before we serviced it.

by Eric Seifert
Automotive Technical Editor

Recently, we serviced Paul’s 2002 Dodge Durango. The next day he parked his truck at the airport and flew to Philadelphia for a sales convention. When Paul returned, he called me with a problem. While leaving the airport he put the truck in reverse, but it didn’t move for a few seconds. I asked him to bring the Durango in so we could determine the problem, since the truck hadn’t had any issues before we serviced it.

The complaint involves a transmission delayed shift condition that may occur following the replacement of the internal cooler return filter.

Note: This information applies to vehicles equipped with a 45RFE or a 545RFE automatic transmission (sales code DG4 or DGQ respectively).

The customer may experience an initial delayed shift engagement following an extended off (not running) period of time, generally after being parked overnight. The initial shift engagement may feel like a delay or slip when a transmission gear (reverse or drive) is first selected after engine start.

The customer may not experience the delayed shift engagement until after the transmission has been serviced, where the cooler return filter was replaced. The condition is not detrimental to the transmission, but may cause concern with the customer.

The repair will require one Mopar P/N 04799662 cooler return filter.

Applicable Vehicles
• 2000 – 2004 (AN) Dakota
• 2002 – 2006 (KJ) Liberty
• 2000 – 2003 (DN) Durango
• 1999 – 2004 (WJ/WG) Grand Cherokee
• 2003 – 2006 (DR) Ram Truck
• 2005 – 2006 (WK/WH) Grand Cherokee
• 2004 – 2006 (HB) Durango
• 2006 (XK) Commander

Repair Procedure (Review cooler filter replacement and safety procedures in the ALLDATA system before beginning.)

The above condition may be caused by a suspect cooler return filter — part number of 04799662AB. This "AB" suffix/level filter may allow transmission fluid to drain back out of the torque converter. The drain back condition may occur over a period time when the engine (and transmission) is not running. With less fluid in the torque converter, a delay in gear engagement may occur at engine start up while the torque converter fills to its proper fluid level.

All 04799662AB cooler return filters with the "AB" suffix are suspect. The above condition may be corrected by replacing a suspect "AB" filter with a new cooler return filter whose part number is 04799662 (with no suffix or with a suffix that is other than the "AB" level).

Note: A replacement 04799662 cooler return filter may come packaged with a separate threaded adapter stud. The threaded adapter stud is used to attach the cooler return filter to the transmission. Inspect the stud and note end without threads. Install the stud end without the threads into the cooler return filter and tighten the stud-to-filter connection to 18.6 Nm (165 in. lbs.). Once the threaded adapter stud has been installed to the cooler return filter, install the assembled cooler return filter to the transmission and tighten the filter to 14.1 Nm (125 in. lbs.)

Written by ALLDATA Technical Editor, Eric Seifert. Eric is an ASE certified Master Technician and Engine Machinist. He is a graduate of the De Anza College Automotive Technology Program, with 20 years of independent shop and parts store experience.

For additional information, visit www.alldata.com.

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