Tech Tip: Piston Ring Installation in Smaller Bores – UnderhoodService

Tech Tip: Piston Ring Installation in Smaller Bores

The event of engine downsizing has caused many changes in almost every engine component. Piston rings are no exception. They have been reduced in diameter as cylinder bores have become smaller, with corresponding width and wall reductions. Compression rings 1.5 mm wide (.0575") are becoming more common then rings which are 2.0 mm (.0775") or wider ....

The event of engine downsizing has caused many changes in almost every engine component. Piston rings are no exception. They have been reduced in diameter as cylinder bores have become smaller, with corresponding width and wall reductions. Compression rings 1.5 mm wide (.0575") are becoming more common then rings which are 2.0 mm (.0775") or wider.

This reduction in the cross sectional size of the ring has caused the ring to become somewhat more fragile with respect to handling than rings of larger cross sectional size. For this reason it is necessary to use care whenever these rings are being handled, but most importantly when the ring is being installed on the piston.

Care should be taken to follow the instructions below:

1. Use proper piston ring installation tools.

2. Keep the ring absolutely flat when opening to install on the piston.

3. Place the ring squarely in the groove and carefully release the tension of the ring installer.

If these procedures are not followed, damage will occur to the axial and/or radial shape of the ring, as illustrated in Figure 1 and Figure 2.

If the rings are installed after this type of damage has been inflicted, engine performance will be affected. Blow-by will increase and oil control will suffer.

Compression rings must never be spiraled on the piston. Remember that these procedures are always important in all piston ring installations, and the more fragile the ring, the more care must be exercised.

Tech Tip courtesy of Hastings Manufacturing, LLC.

For information on products offered by Hastings Manufacturing, contact Hastings Manufacturing Company, LLC, 325 North Hanover St., Hastings, MI 49058-1598, (269) 945-2491, (800) 776-1088, [email protected], www.hastingsracing.com.

You May Also Like

Alternator Testing For No Charge Conditions

Many alternator problems turn out to be nothing more than a bad connection at the alternator or a bad wiring harness.

If only battery voltage is present at the battery on a running engine, does this mean the alternator is “bad?” No, it does not. It only means that the alternator is not charging, but does not reveal why. Therefore, it does not point to a faulty alternator. All too often, the alternator is condemned by technicians due to this test alone. The cause could instead be a module that distributes the power to the vehicle and regulates the alternator.

Understanding Coolants

All-season coolant used inorganic acid technology and worked great for almost 30 years.

Ignition System Do’s and Don’ts

Why do ignition systems give technicians problems when diagnosing ignition-related misfires? The answer is that some technicians use tests that might give inconclusive results or do damage to the coil or drivers inside a module.

Tools To Service Serpentine Belts

Servicing the serpentine belt on some vehicles is a tough task.

Battery Charging and Diagnostics

Here are six tips to use when diagnosing a vehicle with a dead battery. 

Other Posts

Why Do Timing Chains Stretch?

As the timing chain wears, it can change the timing of the camshaft and crankshaft.

Carbon Deposits and Direct Injection Engines

The primary cause of these problems is that fuel and added detergents are not hitting the back of the intake valves.

Acura Turbo Engine Service

It is important to check the operation of the solenoids that control vacuum to the actuators.

Subaru EJ25 Head Gasket Problems

Most of the EJ head gasket failures occur around the 100,000-mile mark and start as a slow oil or coolant leak.