Tech Tip: Diagnosing a Ford Escape with Engine Ticking Noises – UnderhoodService

Tech Tip: Diagnosing a Ford Escape with Engine Ticking Noises

If a customer brings in a 2006 Ford Escape with a ticking noise in the left bank cylinder head engine area, refer to the following service procedure to identify and resolve the issue. To diagnose, with the engine running and warm (normal operation temperature), use a mechanic's stethoscope to determine if the ticking noise is coming from the ....

If a customer brings in a 2006 Ford Escape with a ticking noise in the left bank cylinder head engine area, refer to the following service procedure to identify and resolve the issue.

Vehicles affected: 2005-’07 Five Hundred, Freestyle Montego, 2006-’07 Fusion and Milan, 2006 Zephyr, and 2006-’08 Escape and Mariner vehicles built 1/17/2006 through 5/31/2007, equipped with the 3.0L 4V Duratec engine with exhaust camshaft-driven water pumps.

Service Procedure
To diagnose, with the engine running and warm (normal operation temperature), use a mechanic’s stethoscope to determine if the ticking noise is coming from the left-hand exhaust camshaft at cylinder #6 (see Figure 1). If the ticking noise can be verified, refer to the following instructions.

For 2008 Escape and Mariner, check the date on the left-hand cam cover engine label. If the engine build date is 5/16/20007 or before, refer to the following to identify and resolve the engine ticking noise. For engines built after this date, this procedure does not apply; refer the Workshop Manual (WSM), Section 303-00.

For 2007 Fusion and Milan, check the date on the front cover label. If the engine build date is 5/9/2007 or before, refer to the following to identify and resolve the engine ticking noise. For engines built after this date, this procedure does not apply; refer the WSM, Section 303-00.

1. Remove the left-hand camshaft cover. Refer to WSM, Section 303-01 of the appropriate manual.

2. Rotate the engine clockwise until the cylinder #6 exhaust cam lobes are pointing up and the valves are fully closed.

3. Remove all left-hand exhaust cam caps individually and reinstall them finger tight.

4. Torque bolts in sequence as shown in Figure 2, to 72 lbs.-in. (8 Nm) excluding cam cap #4L camshaft cap.

5. Using a screwdriver positioned on each side of the top of cam cap #4L (see Figure 3), apply hand pressure and shift cam cap #4L toward the exhaust side of the cylinder head.

6. While holding cam cap #4L in the shifted position, torque fastener #9 (inboard) first, to 72 lbs.-in. (8 Nm), then torque fastener #10 (Figure 3).

7. Install the left-hand camshaft cover. Refer to the appropriate WSM, Section 303-01.

8. Fully warm the engine to verify the repair.

Technical service bulletin courtesy of Mitchell 1.

For more information on Mitchell 1 products and services, automotive professionals can log onto the company’s website at www.mitchell1.com.

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