Brake Job On 2000-2006 Chrysler Sebring – UnderhoodService
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Brake Job On 2000-2006 Chrysler Sebring

The second-generation Chrysler Sebring brakes are problem free when compared to the previous generation. There are very few reports online about pulsation problems that seemed to plague the previous generation. The 2000-2006 Sebring front brakes can have different caliper designs depending on the engine and model year, and even if it is a convertible. Make sure the parts store has all the information before you order parts.

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The second-generation Chrysler Sebring brakes are problem free when compared to the previous generation. There are very few reports online about pulsation problems that seemed to plague the previous generation.
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Front Brakes

The 2000-2006 Sebring front brakes can have different caliper designs depending on the engine and model year, and even if it is a convertible. Make sure the parts store has all the information before you order parts. 
 
Most of the rotors are the same diameter, but, year-to-year, Chrysler changed the thickness specifications. Some aftermarket suppliers have created a single part number to reduce inventory. Because of this, it is best to use the discard specification stamped on the rotor and not the specification in the manual. 
 
All brake calipers are the low-drag type utilizing a single-piston floating design. There are two different caliper guide pin bolts used at each brake caliper, one of which has a sleeve at the tip of the guide pin. It is there for anti-rattle and noise suppression issues and must be placed correctly to work properly. At each front brake caliper, this bolt is placed at the upper location.
 
If any of the boots and seals that keep the grease in the guide pins are worn or leaking, buy a new hardware kit. 
Rear Disc Brakes
The rear brakes use a conventional single-piston caliper with the parking brake in the drum of the rotor’s hat. The drum has two shoes and an adjuster.

 
Install the adjuster so that the shoe adjusting bolt of the left hand wheel is attached towards the front of the vehicle, and the shoe adjusting bolt of right hand wheel is towards the rear of the vehicle. There should be no drag on the rear rotor and the leaver should fully engage after 3-5 clicks. 
 
REAR DRUMS
The drum brakes are all two-shoe, internal-expanding type with an automatic adjuster screw. After replacing the shoes, road test vehicle stopping in both forward and reverse directions. The automatic-adjuster will continue to adjust brakes as necessary during the road test.
 

Adjust the brake shoes to the drum diameter using a brake shoe gauge.

The brake drums should lightly drag on the shoes. Further adjustments may be done using the adjustment procedure as necessary. 
 
To adjust the shoe diameter, turn the adjuster wheel using a screwdriver inserted through the adjusting hole in the rear of the shoe support plate.
 
Once the tip of the screwdriver contacts the adjuster wheel teeth, move the handle of the tool upward using the support plate as a pivot to adjust the shoes outward. To back the shoes off, push on the pawl with the screwdriver to disengage it from the adjuster wheel teeth, rotate the wheel upward to back off the adjustment using another screwdriver or a brake adjuster tool.
PADS
Brake pads must be replaced when usable material on a brake pad lining measured at its thinnest point measures 2 mm millimeter (0.04 inch) or less. It is important to inspect both front and rear brake pads during the same inspection. 
 
Front disc brakes are equipped with an audible wear indicator on the left side inboard brake pad only. The right side pads do not include an audible wear indicator. Rear disc brakes are equipped with audible wear indicators on both left side and right side inboard brake pads. 

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