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Strange Requests At The Service Counter

Sometimes, I have to wonder if certain ­customers’ brains are firing on all cylinders. But as an automotive service professional, I have to maintain a certain level of self-control while answering their questions, even though what they’re...

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Are All Cars ‘Supercars’ Now?

I attended an open house at Smokey’s Dyno in Akron, Ohio, last month. The shop was filled with Lamborghinis, Jaguars and other high-end cars. It was a great chance to look under the hoods of some supercars. The shop even had a rare McLaren P1 sitting...

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Documenting Inspections: Are You Leaving Maintenance Dollars on the Table?

How do you translate scribbles on a ­repair order into sales? There is no magic trick involved — the key is to document the vehicle ­inspection process. The more you know about your customers’ vehicles, and the more you are able to document...

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Mazda: Performing Regular Undercar Maintenance

This month, we’ll take a look at brake and undercar service on the Mazda vehicle lineup, with the footnote that even though this type of work ­becomes routine when you have a preventive maintenance mindset, good work habits from beginning to end are...

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Import Automatic Transmission Diagnostics

Don’t be alarmed if you pull an automatic transmission trouble code when diagnosing a “check engine” warning light! Since the automatic transmission operation has a major effect on grams-per-mile exhaust emissions, you’re going to see the...

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Honda: Vehicle Won’t Move or Barely Moves

A customer brings in a vehicle that won’t move forward, ­­backward or both. Check first to see if it grinds or clicks. And does the speedometer read a lot higher than you’re actually going? Chances are the driveshaft is disengaged. This can...

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TPMS Service Tip: Ask the Right Questions

If there is one piece of major advice for any tire tech facing a TPMS issue, it would be this: Test before you touch, and document the answers you get. Understanding the potential TPMS land mines can save time and money and eliminate frustrations. Get...

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False ABS Activation After Wheel Bearing Hub Replacement

Vehicles: All ABS-equipped vehicles Condition: Vehicle had wheel bearing hub replaced on one side. Repair Procedure: If you diagnose a bad hub bearing on one side of a vehicle and the ABS wheel speed sensor or tone ring is integral to the bearing,...

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Are you afraid of selling alignments?

I am starting to notice a trend when it comes to alignments. It’s not the vehicles that are changing, but rather the attitudes toward alignment services — and it happens at independent repair shops, franchise shops and even dealers. The alignment...

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iATN Exceeds 2 Million Forum Messages

The number of messages in the professional automotive discussion forums of the International Automotive Technicians Network (iATN) exceeded 2 million in early December 2014, with the Shop Management and Technical Discussion forums being the most popular...

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Diagnosing Starter Misses

Contributing writer Gary Goms was called to a friend’s shop to help with a no-cranking condition on a 2006 Chevy Tahoe. After diagnosing a faulty PCM ground, locating the missing ground proved to be problematic. Find out how Gary solves The Case...

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Snap-on Adds Diagnostic Calculator To Website

Snap-on announces a new diagnostic calculator feature has been added to its website at http://diagnostics.snapon.com to help automotive repair technicians and shop owners determine how much profit they could be making by using a Snap-on diagnostic platform,...

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Home Engine Tech Tip: How to Time a Perkins Diesel Engine

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This bulletin from Foley Engines can be used to assist you in timing a Perkins diesel 4.108, 4.236, 4.248 and 6.354 engine. Certain measures need to be taken when removing the fuel injection pump as well installing it.

Removal: First, before removing the injection pump make sure you can still see the scribe mark that Perkins put on the engine block.  This can be found on the engine block just under the injection pump flange.  Having a hard time finding this mark? Locate the other scribe mark on the ear of the injection pump (there are three mounting ears; the mark should be on the one facing away from the engine).  If you do not find this scribe mark on the block than make your own using a knife or other sharp object. The two lines or scribe marks should be in line with each other. This will truly save you a huge headache later on when installing the new or remanufactured injection pump.
 
Next, unbolt the three mounting bolts that hold the pump on to the block. If you’re working with the Perkins 4.108 marine, 6.354.0 or 6.354.4 marine or industrial the pump will slide straight back and the removal will take no time at all. If you are working with a later Perkins 4.108 industrial or a 4.107 or 4.108 Westerbeke marine engine one extra step will be necessary (these engines use a Lucas mechanical pump).  See note below if you have one of the later engines mentioned above.
 
Note: If you’re working with one of the above engines; you must remove the inspection cover located on the face of the timing cover. Inside you will find a three bolt hub that connects the injection pump to the drive gear. You must remove the three bolts before you proceed with the removal. One extra thing: stuff a rag in the cavity between the drive gear and the timing cover. It’s easy to drop one of these bolts into the crankcase.  
 
Installation: Once you have your remanufactured pump from you’re ready to install. Locate the splined input shaft on the replacement pump. This splined shaft will have two splines on it which are either Siamese together or in some case one of the splines will be missing. This makes the pump shaft go into the drive hub (mounted on the injection pump drive gear) one way only.
 
Next, once the pump is in hand tighten the three bolts that mount the pump to the engine. Here comes the most important part. The two scribe marks (one on the pump flange, the other on the block) have to be lined up to look like one line (perfectly inline with each other). This times the engine. Finally, tighten the three bolts to lock the pump in position.
 
If you have one the engines in the note located in the removal section: this is the time to re-install the three bolts in the drive hub (make sure you keep that rag in timing cover!).
 
At this point, the pump is back on, the scribe marks are lined up to time the engine and you are ready to put the fuel lines back on and bleed the system.    
 
For more information on how to bleed the fuel system, check out these other tech bulletins from Foley Engines: Tech Tip #29: Bleeding Lucas, Stanadyne and Diesel Kiki Fuel Systems and also Tech Tip #41: Bleeding Perkins, Deutz and Deere Fuel Systems, Part 2.  

–Courtesy of Foley Engines.

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