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Automotive Pet Peeves 2: Reader Feedback Is Overwhelming

How many auto repair pet peeves are out there? Well, enough of them that one article wouldn’t hold them all. I’ve received so many emails, texts and phone calls about my article in the February issue that I thought: why not put everyone’s pet peeve...

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Air Filter Show & Tell: Seeing Is Believing

Air filters are normal wear items that ­require regular checks and ­replacement. Their role is to trap dirt particles that can cause damage to engine cylinders, walls, pistons and piston rings. In fuel-injected vehicles, the air filter also plays...

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Searching For 'Black Holes': Job Totals Reveal Missed Selling Opportunities

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MAZDA: Timing Belt & Chain Replacement

This month, we’re going to be looking at the ­timing components on the Mazda line of vehicles. We’ll be focusing on timing belts since they are considered a service item and will present the greater amount of opportunity for replacement. Then, we’ll...

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It may look like a car that was never removed from the box it came in, but the Honda Element isn’t boxy when it comes to the brakes. Based on the CR-V platform, there is also nothing tricky when it comes to service. But, its brake system is hardware...

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The Changing Maintenance Market: New Technologies Mean More Opportunities

Most of us wake up each morning, not ­realizing that our professional world has changed even as we slept. Our first job of the day is to service a ­vehicle equipped with an oil life monitor. Not only do we discover that modern oil life monitors can...

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Electronic Proportioning Valve: Doing More With Less Hardware

Anti-lock brake systems (ABS) and the HCU are replacing proportioning, combination and other valves to change the braking forces in the front and rear. This is called Electronic Brake Distribution (EBD) and it can dynamically change the proportioning...

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NHTSA’s GM Brake Line Corrosion Investigation: Reading Between the Brake Lines

There will be no recalls on some GM vehicles for brake line corrosion. Instead, we received an advisory from the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) about brake line inspection and car washes. What was not discussed was the corrosion...

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2007-2011 Ford Expedition and Navigator Air Suspension

The Ford Expedition air suspension does more than just lift and raise the vehicle. The system levels the vehicle under loads and when a trailer is attached. The system uses only two air bags on the rear axle unlike previous models with air bags on all...

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Maintaining Your Spray Guns

If there’s one piece of equipment that epitomizes the painter and the paint shop, it’s the spray gun. Over the years we’ve seen many spray guns. Although there are operating principles and functions that remain the same, some have been improved...

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Wheel Bearing Adjustment Tools & Equipment

A recent survey showed that more than half of the bearings on the road today are adjusted incorrectly. A wheel bearing that’s out of adjustment can reduce bearing life and can affect more than just the bearing. An out-of-adjustment bearing affects...

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ETI's ToolTech 2015 Focuses on the Connected Vehicle

ETI’s Annual ToolTech conference remains the premiere event in the tool and equipment industry with more than 115 professionals from over 50 companies in attendance at this year’s ToolTech 2015 in Austin, TX. The Equipment and Tool Institute's...

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Home Cooling Tech Feature: Straight Up Look at the Vortec 3500 Straight-Five Engine

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these engines are interference engines with tight valve-to-piston clearances, so accurate cam timing is absolutely essential. The cam phaser on the front of the exhaust cam can retard exhaust valve timing from 0 to 25 degrees.

At idle, it is in the fully advanced position, and must be installed in this position to prevent the exhaust valves from hitting the ­pistons.

Changing the timing chain requires using a J44221 Cam Holding Tool (or equivalent) to keep the cams from moving when the chain is taken off.

The basic procedure is to remove the intake and exhaust cam position sensors, remove the front cover, rotate the crankshaft so number one piston is at TDC (top dead center), install the cam holding tool, then release tension on the timing chain by moving the tensioner shoe in.

idle problems caused by dirt or fuel varnish in the throttle body can be removed with throttle cleaner. Use a tee to lock the tensioner in place, remove the cam phaser from the exhaust cam, then the sprocket from the intake cam, and finally the crank sprocket (all three sprockets should be replaced along with the timing chain).

Every seventh link on the timing chain is darkened to aid in aligning the timing marks. After installing a new sprocket on the crankshaft, align one of these marks on the chain with the mark on the sprocket (which should be at the 5 o’clock position).

Align another dark link on the chain with the timing mark on the intake cam sprocket (1 o’clock position). Then install the cam phaser on the exhaust cam. T

he word “Delphi” should be level and parallel to the seam on the head, and the cam phaser must be in the fully advanced position. Align another dark link on the chain with the mark on the exhaust sprocket (which should be at the 11 o’clock position).

Remove the tee from the chain tensioner and make sure all of the timing marks are correctly aligned.

starter icing issues eliminated — the vortec 3500 is fitted with a new vented starter solenoid. the solenoid case has a micromesh-covered vent that protects the solenoid from debris particles but prevents moisture buildup. when the engine is warm, any moisture on the solenoid evaporates through the vent. the vented solenoid virtually eliminates the possibility of cold-start problems associated with solenoid icing.Sensors
These engines use a single magnetic crank sensor mounted in the block near the back of the engine, and a pair of camshaft sensors mounted in the front of the cylinder head to monitor crankshaft position and cam phasing.

If the crank sensor, either cam sensor or the PCM (Powertrain Control Module) on one of these applications has to be replaced for any reason, you must perform a CKP System Variation Learn Procedure using a Tech 1 or similar scan tool.

It’s the same procedure that’s required on many other GM engines so the PCM can learn the relative positions of the crank and cam sensors. If the procedure is not performed, the engine may not run properly or may not start.

The 2004 version of the 3500 came with two knock sensors. Knock protection was deemed critical on these engines because of their high compression ratio (10:1) and use of regular 87 octane fuel.

But improved PCM programming allowed GM to discontinue the second knock sensor in 2005. The remaining knock sensor is located on the left side of the engine between cylinders number 3 and 4.

Inputs for fuel management are provided by a mass airflow (MAF) sensor mounted ahead of the electronic throttle body, a manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor on the intake manifold and a throttle position (TPS) sensor on the throttle.

A buildup of dirt or fuel varnish on the MAF sensor may cause lean codes to set. Cleaning the MAF sensor with aerosol electronics cleaner can often correct this kind of problem. Idle problems caused by dirt or fuel varnish in the throttle body can be removed with throttle cleaner.

Maintenance
Starting in 2004, the recommended oil for the 2800, 3500 and 4200 engines is 5W-30 that meets GF-4 specifications. The crankcase oil capacity is six quarts.

GM uses its Oil Life Monitor System on these applications to indicate when it’s time to change the oil.

Based on vehicle usage, temperature, run time, vehicle speed, load and so on, the estimated oil change interval may vary from as little as 3,000 miles to as much as 15,000 miles.

We think pushing the oil change interval much beyond 7,500 miles with any oil other than a top quality full synthetic is asking for trouble.

The Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon both have conventional fuel filters located outside the fuel tank that can be replaced on an “as needed” basis. GM offers no recommended service interval for the filter.

The serpentine belt likewise has no recommended replacement interval. Most belts are good for 100,000 miles, but need to be inspected to check for wear and proper tension. Belt noise and/or accelerated wear can be caused by pulley misalignment. GM TSB 08-06-01-006A says to use a laser pulley alignment checker if you suspect belt noise or wear may be due to misalignment of the power steering pump pulley.

The original equipment spark plugs have a 100,000-mile replacement interval (gap is 0.042”).

Inspect the engine air filter every 15,000 miles and replace as needed. The Chevy Colorado and GMC Canyon are not equipped with a cabin air filter.

The Dex-Cool coolant is a five-year/150,000-mile coolant. Most trucks will reach five years before the odometer hits 150,000 miles, so recommend changing the coolant after five years of service. Waiting longer increases the risk of damaging coolant corrosion and expensive cooling system repairs. 

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Larry Carley

Larry Carley has more than 30 years of experience in the automotive aftermarket, including experience as an ASE-certified technician, and has won numerous awards for his articles. He has written 12 automotive-related books and developed automotive training software, available at www.carleysoftware.com.
  • Mike

    I’m having problems taking off the front engine cover on my 2005 gym canyon 3.5. The book says to remove the oil pan. Is there a oil pump tube or something attached the the front cover cause i cant get it off?

    • Mydriasis

      Yank it.

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