AfterMarketNews Auto Care Pro AutoProJobs Auto-Video.com Brake&Frontend BodyShopBusiness Counterman EngineBuilder Fleet Equipment ImportCar Motorcycle & Powersports News Servicio Automotriz Shop Owner Tire Review Tech Shop Tomorrow's Tech Underhood Service

Clint Bowyer Crew Chief Billy Scott Wins Career-First MOOG 'Problem Solver' Award

Billy Scott, crew chief for Clint Bowyer and the No. 15 Maxwell House Toyota Camry, won his career-first MOOG Steering and Suspension “Problem Solver of the Race” Award after Bowyer made a late charge to finish sixth in Sunday’s Cheez-It 355 NASCAR...

Read more...

A New Way To Learn: Bosch Xperience Mobile Tour Comes To Babcox

The Bosch Xperience Mobile Tour made a stop on Aug. 5 at Babcox Media. Editors were invited to experience the simulated virtual workshop, working through a series of real-world vehicle repair problems using Oculus Rift headset technology. Two trucks,...

Read more...

Raybestos Partners With Schwartz Performance To Restore Classic '69 Mustang Fastback

Raybestos has joined forces once again with Schwartz Performance to restore an American icon muscle car: a 1969 Ford Mustang Fastback. “Raybestos and Mustang are the perfect match of history, leadership and innovation. Working with the first-class...

Read more...

Be Wary of the Fall Maintenance Slowdown

If you think you don’t need to do any more marketing this quarter because you’ve been riding the summer vehicle maintenance wave, think again. While your car count is likely high — due to road trip inspections, oil changes, A/C service and unperformed...

Read more...

Honda Civic: Failed PCMs and CAN System Diagnostics

It’s not unusual for me to get help requests through my e-mail. Sometimes it’s from working technicians, other times it’s from vehicle owners who can’t get their problems solved through professional repair shops. In early 2014, I received one...

Read more...

2002 Lexus Evaporative Emissions Diagnostics

Evaporative Emissions Diagnostics: Start With The Basics Across the country, it’s common for car lovers to meet in random groups with their rides, hang out and share their stories, ideas and dreams — it’s something I really enjoy. If you take...

Read more...

How to Test Drive a Car to Check for Problems

Test Drive Diagnostics Test drives on the surface can seem like one of the most unprofitable tasks a technician can perform. But, test drives can be one of the most profitable processes a shop can do to help sell more service. You just have to have procedures...

Read more...

Cheap Brake Pads

The Real Cost of Installing Cheap Brake Pads Ever since the first issue of Brake & Front End came off the presses, the magazine has warned of the costs of using inferior friction materials with brake pads. In the 1930s, the magazine fought the fight...

Read more...

Troubleshooting ABS Modulator Mechanical Problems

Understanding ABS Modulator Problems Mechanical issues with the ABS modulator, or hydraulic control units (HCU), are rare, but they can happen. With more and more vehicles on the roads with older ABS systems that have not seen proper brake fluid maintenance,...

Read more...

Identifix Celebrates 50,000 Direct-Hit Subscribers with 50K Giveaway Contest

Identifix, Inc. has reached another milestone: its 50,000th subscriber to Direct-Hit, its award-winning online tool. To commemorate the occasion, the company has launched a contest called the 50K Giveaway. Five Direct-Hit users who submit a Hotline...

Read more...

Liquid Tools: Choose Your Maintenance Chemicals Based On The Application

The shelves in most parts stores are stocked with an abundance of aerosol maintenance products – everything from cleaners to lubricants. The huge selection of products can be overwhelming, leading to confusion about which product you should purchase...

Read more...

Snap-on Franchisee Conference Draws Record Crowd

Snap-on reports that it drew a record-setting crowd for its Snap-on Franchisee Conference (SFC) held in Washington, D.C., this year. The three-day business conference brings together Snap-on Tools franchisees for insight, information and celebration...

Read more...

Home Engine Getting a Fix on Piston Diagnosis and Inspection

Print Print Email Email

Piston failures in late-model engines are relatively uncommon thanks to computerized engine controls that keep a close watch on the air/fuel mixture, and knock sensors that back off spark timing advance if detonation is detected. Pistons are also lasting longer because many engines now come factory-equipped with stronger hypereutectic alloy pistons that can withstand higher operating temperatures, or even forged pistons. Some pistons also have a factory anti-scuff coating on the skirt to prevent damage if the engine overheats or runs low on oil.

Yet in spite of these things, pistons do sometimes fail. The symptoms of a piston failure can include engine noise (rattling or knocking noises while the engine is idling), oil burning, misfiring and loss of power.

If the Check Engine light is on and you find a misfire code for a specific cylinder, and the engine is suffering any or all of the above symptoms, it may be a clue that you’re dealing with a mechanical problem rather than a fuel or ignition problem. Misfires can be caused by a variety of problems, including a dirty or dead fuel injector, a bad spark plug or plug wire, or a bad ignition coil on a coil-on-plug or multi-coil distributorless ignition system. But a fuel or ignition problem won’t cause engine noise or blue smoke in the exhaust.

Loss of compression also can cause a misfire and a loss of power. A compression loss can occur if the engine has a burned exhaust valve, a bent valve, weak or broken valve springs, a blown head gasket, a rounded cam lobe — or a bad piston. If a compression test shows little or no compression in a cylinder, and a leakdown test reveals compression is being lost into the crankcase and not out the intake or exhaust ports, chances are the piston has a hole in it or is badly cracked. Unless you have a bore scope (a fiber-optic tool that lets you peer inside the cylinder with a small probe inserted through the spark plug hole), the cylinder head will have to come off the engine so you can inspect the piston.

If the engine is burning oil and there is blue smoke in the exhaust, the problem could be worn valve guides and valve guide seals, worn or broken piston rings, or even a cracked piston.

Diagnosing a Burned Piston
If the top of the piston has a melted appearance, or it has a hole burned through the top, the piston has been running way too hot. Preignition and/or detonation have destroyed the piston. Aluminum melts when combustion temperatures get too high, so don’t blame the piston. The fault is whatever created too much heat in the combustion chamber.

One of the most likely causes of a burned piston is a dirty fuel injector that is running way too lean. If you found any trouble codes such as a P0171 or P0174 that indicate a lean fuel condition on the same cylinder bank as the bad piston, bingo, the engine likely has a dirty injector on that cylinder, and possibly dirty injectors on the other cylinders, too. The only way to know for sure would be to pull all the injectors, clean them on a fuel injector cleaning machine, then flow-test all the injectors and compare the results. Replace any injector that doesn’t flow within 5 to 8% of the rest.

If you don’t have a fuel injector cleaning machine with a flow tester, the next best thing to do would be to replace the injector on the cylinder with the burned piston, then clean the rest of the injectors once the engine is back together and running again.

Other conditions that can cause a burned piston include the wrong heat range spark plug (too hot for the application), over-advanced ignition timing (unlikely with today’s electronic spark controls), possibly a bad knock sensor that failed to detect detonation, low octane gasoline (bad gas that doesn’t meet a minimum octane rating of 87, or someone using 87 octane gas in a high compression engine that requires premium fuel), or anything that would cause the engine to run hotter than normal (low coolant level, bad thermostat, weak water pump, cooling fan that isn’t working, or a clogged catalytic converter that is creating a restriction and backing up heat in the engine).

On engines that are turbocharged or supercharged, too much boost pressure and/or not enough fuel can burn a piston very quickly. Check the operation of the wastegate and boost control system. If the turbo system has been tweaked to deliver higher-than-stock boost pressure for more power, the turbo may be pushing more air into the engine than the stock injectors can handle, causing the fuel mixture to lean out and burn the piston.

Just remember, if an engine burned a piston, it did so for a reason. So until that reason has been diagnosed and repaired, it’s pointless to replace the piston.

Cracked Piston
Detonation is the most likely cause of a cracked or broken piston. The hammer-like blows of detonation can literally beat a piston to death. The causes are similar to those that can burn a piston: a lean fuel mixture, over-advanced spark timing, a bad knock sensor, low octane fuel or anything that causes the engine to run hotter than normal.

Loss of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a common cause of detonation (spark knock) because EGR has a cooling effect on combustion temperatures. Consequently, if the EGR system isn’t working, combustion temperatures may exceed the octane rating of the fuel causing the air/fuel mixture to ignite spontaneously before the spark plug fires. The knock sensor should detect the rattling noises produced by detonation and signal the PCM to back off spark timing. But if the knock sensor isn’t working, or the PCM fails to retard timing, detonation may continue unchecked and eventually damage the engine. Possible causes for loss of EGR include a bad EGR valve, loss of vacuum to the EGR valve (due to a leaky hose or EGR vacuum solenoid) or carbon buildup under the EGR that restricts exhaust flow back into the intake manifold. If you suspect an EGR problem, check the operation of the system and remove the EGR valve to inspect the intake manifold passageways for carbon buildup (clean as needed).

Scuffed Piston
Scuffed pistons can be caused by too much heat in the combustion chamber, the engine overheating or inadequate lubrication. The piston-to-cylinder clearances in most late-model engines are much less than they used to be to reduce piston rock and noise. So if the piston or cylinder gets too hot, the clearance goes away and you get metal-to-metal contact. That’s where the anti-scuff skirt coatings on some late-model pistons come into play. The coating provides a layer of protection that can reduce scuffing under adverse operating conditions. It can’t protect the piston indefinitely, but it can provide a degree of protection that is nonexistent with a standard uncoated piston.

In cases where piston scuffing is lubrication related, the cause may be a low oil level (due to a lack of maintenance or oil leaks), low oil pressure (the pistons and rings rely on splash lubrication, so reduced oil flow due to a worn oil pump is a possibility) or poor oil quality.

When diagnosing a scuffed piston, note where the piston is scuffed. If the cause is overheating, the scuffing will mostly be on the upper ring lands and on the sides near the wrist pins. There also may be oil carbon and lacquer burned onto the underside of the piston indicating it got too hot. Scuff marks on the lower skirt area often indicate a lack of lubrication (check the oil pump and pickup screen). Scuff marks on the edges or corners of the thrust sides of the piston may be the result of bore distortion. Scuffing on both thrust sides would indicate binding in the wrist pin.

As before, it’s a waste of time to replace a scuffed piston until the cause has been determined and corrected.

Scored Piston
Grooves or scratches down the side of a piston and/or dents, dings and marks on the top of a piston are the result of dirt or debris getting into the cylinder. Chances are more than one piston will be affected. The cause could be a missing or ill-fitting air filter. On a turbocharged engine, check the turbo compressor wheel for damage that may have thrown shrapnel into the engine.

Vertical scratches on the piston rings would also tell you that dirt and debris have been getting into the engine. If the damage is mostly on the top ring, check the engine’s air filter and intake system. If the scratches are on the oil ring, the contamination is in the crankcase. Check the PCV system and crankcase breather for leaks.

Damaged Piston Ring Lands or Grooves
Too much heat is the most likely cause of ring land or groove damage. This problem most often occurs in the top ring groove because it is exposed to the most heat from the combustion chamber. Anything that causes the fuel mixture to run lean or the engine to run hot can be a contributing factor.

On many late-model pistons, the top ring groove is very close to the piston crown to reduce emissions. The crevice between the top ring and the piston crown can trap unburned fuel, increasing hydrocarbon emissions. Also, many pistons are shorter to reduce weight, so the ring pack is positioned further up on the piston body.

The top ring on many engines today runs at close to 600° F, while the second ring is seeing temperatures of 300° F or less. Ordinary cast iron compression rings that work great in a stock 350 Chevy V8 can’t take this kind of heat. That’s why many late-model engines have steel or ductile iron top rings. Steel is more durable than plain cast iron or even ductile iron, and is required for high output, high load applications including turbocharged and supercharged engines as well as diesels and performance engines. Some piston manufacturers also anodize or coat the ring grooves to improve piston and ring durability.

Destroyed Piston
If a piston has shattered and self-destructed, it likely hit a valve. On interference engines, there’s not enough clearance between the piston and valves to avoid direct contact if the timing belt breaks. In most instances, the pistons will survive a timing belt failure but bend the valves. But, in some instances, the sudden impact of a valve against a piston is more than the casting can handle, causing the piston to shatter like a hand grenade. The debris goes into the crankcase and may cause additional damage to the bearings or other pistons.

This kind of piston failure is really bad news because the engine must be torn down and thoroughly cleaned to flush out all the debris before it can be rebuilt. A piston can also shatter if an engine sucks a valve or the head breaks off of a valve. A dropped valve can occur if the valve spring keeper fails or pulls through (sometimes as a result of over-revving the engine), or the valve spring fails and allows the keeper to pop loose.

If the head of a valve has broken off, the cause is often a lack of concentricity between the valve guide and seat. This causes the valve to flex slightly as it closes, and eventually forms fatigue cracks that lead to valve breakage and failure.

Forged pistons are much more ductile than cast pistons, and are much less likely to shatter if they hit something in the cylinder. But no piston can survive a valve or valve head dropping into a cylinder.

Piston Wrist Pin Damage
Wrist pins can wear out prematurely if the pistons are not receiving enough splash lubrication, but they can also fail as a result of over-revving the engine or too much rod flex. A worn crankshaft thrust bearing that allows too much back-and-forth movement of the crankshaft can flex and twist the rods as the engine runs. Over time this can damage the wrist pins, and cause fatigue cracks to form in the rods, which may lead to rod breakage and failure.

Sometimes a wrist pin will work loose and chew into the cylinder with each stroke of the piston. The underlying cause here may have been improper installation of the retaining lock rings on a full floating wrist pin, improper fit or installation of a pressed-in wrist pin, a twisted or bent connecting rod, excessive thrust end play in the crankshaft or taper wear or misalignment in the crankshaft rod journal.

Piston Noise
Piston slap is a classic symptom of too much clearance between the pistons and cylinder bores. Piston slap is most audible when a cold engine is first started because clearances are greatest then. This doesn’t necessarily mean the pistons are worn, because some new engines will slap a bit when first started. But if the slap doesn’t go away as the engine warms up, it usually means the pistons and/or cylinders are worn. A compression test and/or leakdown test can be used to confirm the diagnosis.

The wrist pins on many pistons are offset slightly so as to load the piston slightly to one side. This reduces piston noise as the piston approaches top dead center (TDC) on its compression stroke, then passes over TDC and starts down on its power stroke.

The following two tabs change content below.

Larry Carley

Larry Carley has more than 30 years of experience in the automotive aftermarket, including experience as an ASE-certified technician, and has won numerous awards for his articles. He has written 12 automotive-related books and developed automotive training software, available at www.carleysoftware.com.
  • sade

    07 Milan….code P2258 replaced valve cover gasket one was bad also there was some oil on the spark plugs i guess due to that as well as oil on a couple of piston will the piston dry out? I also have to put a smog air pump on as well is that someone the cause ????

  • Keith

    Disabled veteran was changing his 2004 Ford F150 engine sparkplugs and accidently dropped a nut in one of the sparkplug openings and can’t get it out. Any suggestions? Any school that needs a vehicle to practice on at little or no cost? Great guy… just needs some help.

Latest articles from our other sites:

Check Out The August Issue Of ImportCar Magazine

A digital version of the August issue of ImportCar is available on-line. CLICK HERE to access the easy-to-view digital version that features articles on Lexus EVAP System Diagnostics, Top 10 Brake Service...More

Trico Products Expands TRICO Exact Fit Rear Blade Lineup

Trico Products has added three new rear blade part numbers to the TRICO Exact Fit blade line. TRICO now offers two new rear integral blades under part No.’s 10-B and 10-E. Part No. 10-B replaces factory-installed...More

How to Test Drive a Car to Check for Problems

Test Drive Diagnostics Test drives on the surface can seem like one of the most unprofitable tasks a technician can perform. But, test drives can be one of the most profitable processes a shop can do...More

Be Wary of the Fall Maintenance Slowdown

If you think you don’t need to do any more marketing this quarter because you’ve been riding the summer vehicle maintenance wave, think again. While your car count is likely high — due to road trip...More

How to Test Drive a Car to Check for Problems

Test Drive Diagnostics Test drives on the surface can seem like one of the most unprofitable tasks a technician can perform. But, test drives can be one of the most profitable processes a shop can do...More

Cheap Brake Pads

The Real Cost of Installing Cheap Brake Pads Ever since the first issue of Brake & Front End came off the presses, the magazine has warned of the costs of using inferior friction materials with brake...More

ISN Opens New Distribution Center In Pacific Northwest

Integrated Supply Network (ISN) says it is continuing to improve logistics and provide stronger customer service by adding a 12th location in Seattle. The company says this solidifies ISN’s footprint...More

Atlas Copco USA's Water For All Organization Celebrates 31st Anniversary With $50,000 Donation To Denver-Based Charity

In honor of its 31st anniversary, the Atlas Copco USA employee-run Water for All organization has donated $50,000 to Denver-based charity Water for People. The donation will fund clean water and sanitation...More